Skip to main content

Paul Jakus

PAUL M. JAKUS

Director
Department of Applied Economics
Utah State University

Paul.Jakus@usu.edu

Dr. Jakus’ research is focused on valuation of non-market goods and regional economics. His past research emphases have been on recreation economics and the economics of risk. Topics have included estimating the economic value of improving water quality, the costs to anglers and consumers of fish consumption advisories associated with mercury and PCBs, and household responses to water-borne arsenic and nutrient pollution. Dr. Jakus has also investigated the impacts of restricted recreational access to public lands. His current research involves linking public lands ownership and management to county-level economic growth and development.

Download Vitae
 

courtney flint

COURTNEY FLINT

Associate Director
Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology
Utah State University

courtney.flint@usu.edu

Dr. Flint's current research explores perceived values and vulnerabilities related to natural resources in dynamic communities and landscapes, particularly related to water sustainability in the Intermountain West. She also collaborates with colleagues in Austria and Switzerland in cross-cultural research on human-nature relationships and landscape decision-making and governance. Courtney serves as vice-chair of the US EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors’ Sustainable and Healthy Communities Committee. She holds a Ph.D. in Rural Sociology from Pennsylvania State University, an M.S. in Geography from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a B.S. in Geography from Northern Arizona University.

Download Vitae
 

jacopo Baggio

JACOPO BAGGIO

Assistant Professor
Department of Environment and Society, College of Natural Resources
Utah State University

jacopo.baggio@usu.com

Dr. Baggio's research focuses on analyzing and modeling social-ecological systems. In order to do this, his main research interests can be divided into two macro areas. One focuses on the conditions under which collective action succeeds in human societies, analyzing what drives collective action and how it is influenced by uncertainty. The other centers upon social-ecological networks, characterizing inter-dependencies between biodiversity, food, water, energy and decision making.

Download Vitae

roslynn brain

ROSLYNN BRAIN

Assistant Professor
Department of Environment and Society
Utah State University

roslynn.brain@usu.edu

Roslynn Brain is an Assistant Professor, Sustainable Communities Extension Specialist in the Department of Environment and Society, College of Natural Resources at Utah State University. She uses conservation theory, communication techniques, and social marketing tools to foster environmental behaviors with a focus on waste reduction and local food movements. Roslynn developed and launched Extension Sustainability, a set of tools and information for the public to engage in sustainable behaviors. She also teaches Communicating Sustainability, has launched a statewide program to connect farmers with restaurants called Utah Farm-Chef-Fork, and she designed and co-teaches sustainability camps for kids in Utah.

Download Vitae
 

ryan bosworth

RYAN BOSWORTH

Associate Professor
Department of Applied Economics
Utah State University

ryan.bosworth@usu.edu

RYAN BOSWORTH, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Economics at Utah State University. He received his PhD from the University of Oregon in 2006. He has also received MS and BS degrees in Economics from Utah State University. He specializes in applied micro-econometrics and has research interests in environmental, transportation economics and health economics. Dr. Bosworth’s research has been published in a variety of outlets including the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Journal of Applied Economics and Policy.

Download Vitae
 

Mark Brunson

MARK W. BRUNSON

Associate Director
Department of Environment & Society
Utah State University

(435) 797-2458
Mark.Brunson@usu.edu

Mark Brunson is an environmental scientist whose work applies methods from both the social and ecological sciences to understand the complex dynamics of human-environment interactions. His work focuses on the causes and consequences of human behaviors in deserts and rangelands, as well as how ecological processes and conditions influence human activities. Current studies investigate how social and institutional factors interact with biological invasions and climate to influence the success of restoration projects following wildfire, how soil-disturbing activities such as recreation travel affect plant fitness and invasion susceptibility, and how cultural and economic factors interact with environmental factors to influence perceptions of wildfire risk and willingness to take steps to reduce risk.

Download Vitae

Emily Burchfield

EMILY BURCHFIELD

title

emily.k.burchfield@vanderbilt.edu

Dr. Burchfield will be joining the USU faculty in August 2017. Her research integrates survey data, geospatial data, remotely-sensed imagery, and qualitative data to identify the factors that moderate the effects of meteorological drought on surface water irrigation systems across space and time. She is particularly interested in using quantitative tools to explore political ecological and distributional dimensions of climate change and adaptation.

Download Vitae
 

steve burr

STEVE BURR

Associate Professor
Department of Environment & Society
Utah State University

steve.burr@usu.edu

Dr. Burr is based at the USU-Moab Center. Dr. Burr’s Extension. His current areas of interest, expertise, and research include: wildland outdoor recreation and natural resources-based tourism policy, planning, and management; sustainable community tourism development; and the human dimensions of natural resources management.

Download Vitae
 

arthur caplan

ARTHUR CAPLAN

Professor
Department of Applied Economics
Utah State University

arthur.caplan@usu.edu

Arthur Caplan’s research in applied environmental economics has focused the control of transboundary pollution problems, non-market valuation of environmental goods, and water quality trading. His more recent work is in the areas of water conservation and air quality. He has also published what he calls “fun, little, provocative” articles on the environmental cost of hypocrisy, the deadweight loss of superficiality, grade inflation, and procrastination. His work has appeared in a variety of general-interest and field journals, such as the Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Urban Economics, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Environmental and Resource Economics, Land Economics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Water Resources Research, Ecological Economics, and Contemporary Economic Policy. He is a former Associate Editor for the Journal of Hydrology.

Download Vitae

Layne Coppock

LAYNE COPPOCK

Professor
Department of Environment & Society
Utah State University

layne.coppock@usu.edu

Dr. Coppock primarily investigates ways to promote sustainable livelihoods via risk management and poverty reduction among people inhabiting rangelands and smallholder farming systems around the world in eastern Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania) and rural Utah. He looks for cost-effective interventions often involving livelihood diversification, education, and improved management of natural resources. Recent projects include: (1) Collective action among pastoral women in southern Ethiopia and northern Kenya; (2) drought coping strategies among Utah ranchers; (3) adoption of soil and water conservation practices among farmers in a Rift Valley watershed of central Kenya; (4) the role of education in promoting wealth creation and wildlife conservation among farmers in the Kigoma Region of western Tanzania; and (5) prospects for enhancing carbon sequestration on Utah rangelands.

Download Vitae

steve daniels

STEVE DANIELS

Professor
Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology
Utah State University

steve.daniels@usu.edu

Much of Dr. Daniels professional interests focus on community linkages to natural resources and in collaborative processes in natural resource management. He has been involved in a number of community-level collaborations, primarily in the Pacific Northwest. With Dr. Gregg Walker of OSU, he is a co-author of “Working Through Environmental Conflict: The Collaborative Learning Approach.”In addition to the Collaborative Learning book, Dr. Daniels has published more than 80 scientific papers, book chapters, and reports. Many of these report experiences or methods developed through Collaborative Leaning projects on behalf of agencies or communities. Working with various federal natural resource management agencies has been Dr. Daniels’ major area of practice. As a result of this broad base of experience, Dr. Daniels has taught in courses for several agencies, NGOs, and at 19 universities in the USA and abroad.

Download Vitae

eric edwards

ERIC EDWARDS

Assistant Professor
Department of Applied Economics
Utah State University

eric.edwards@usu.edu

Dr. Edwards is an empirical microeconomist with expertise in the fields of environmental economics, political economy, and public economics. He specializes in the economics of water markets, and has studied water markets North America, south America, and Australia.

Download Vitae
 

Joanna endter-wada

JOANNA ENDTER-WADA

Professor
Department of Environment and Society, Watershed Sciences
Utah State University

joanna.endter-wada@usu.edu

Dr. Joanna Endter-Wada's research focuses on conceptualizing and analyzing linkages between humans and biophysical aspects of ecosystems, with emphases on water, public land, forest resources, fisheries and urban landscapes. She is currently conducting research on human dimensions of drought and climate change, urban landscape water use, and wetlands. During her professional career, Dr. Endter-Wada has been involved in numerous activities related to translation between academic disciplines and translation of science to the general public. She has directed and been involved in interdisciplinary academic programs and research projects. For the State of Utah, she served as Chairperson of the Utah Fish Health Policy Board, Chairperson of the Utah Forest Practices Task Force, and Member of the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands Advisory Council. She served as Chair of the Outer Continental Shelf Advisory Board Scientific Committee, U.S. Dept. of Interior.

Download Vitae
 

Jennifer Givens

JENNIFER GIVENS

Assistant Professor
Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology
Utah State University

jennifer.givens@usu.edu

Dr. Givens’ research combines environmental sociology and comparative international sociology. Broadly, she studies coupled human and natural systems, investigating factors that impact environmental and social sustainability across nation-states, and how these relationships change over time. Her research addresses issues of inequality, human well-being, sustainability, and energy use, and it explores the connections between development and drivers of climate change. She also conducts research on various forms of environmental concern and action, especially as it varies across countries. Her research is primarily quantitative, using both longitudinal and multilevel modeling techniques.

Download Vitae
 

peter howe

PETER HOWE

Assistant Professor
Department of Environment and Society
Utah State University

peter.howe@usu.edu

Dr. Howe is a human-environment geographer whose research aims to understand how individuals and communities detect and effectively respond to environmental change. His research primarily focuses on the human dimensions of climate change and environmental hazards, including public perceptions and attitudes, vulnerability analysis, disaster risk reduction, and adaptation planning. Research methods include quantitative surveys, mixed methods, geovisualization, multilevel modeling, and spatial analysis.

Download Vitae
 

man-keun kim

MAN-KEUN KIM

Associate Professor
Department of Applied Economics
Utah State University

mk.kim@usu.edu

Man-Keun Kim is an applied regional economist with emphasis on natural resource and environmental economics. His recent research efforts have largely involved policy analyses related to 1) water, rangeland management, and wildfire, 2) regional development, and 3) climate change impact and adaptation. He was formerly a Research Assistant Professor in Resource Economics at University of Nevada-Reno (2007-2010) and an Economist at Joint Global Change Research Institute, University of Maryland (2004-2007). He obtained his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 2004.

Download Vitae

 

Richard Krannich

RICHARD S. KRANNICH

Director
Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology
Utah State University

Richard.Krannich@usu.edu

Dr. Krannich’s research focuses generally on the social implications of natural resource use, development and management, with a primary emphasis on resource and environmental issues affecting non-metropolitan areas of the Intermountain West region of the United States. Currently he is engaged in research focusing on the implications of changes in resource-based economies for social organization and social well-being in western rural communities, and is also involved in a study examining the social implications of utility-scale renewable energy system developments throughout the western region.

Download Vitae
 

Christopher Lant

CHRISTOPHER LANT

Professor and Head
Department of Environment and Society
Utah State University

435-797-4169

Dr. Lant’s work has focused on water resources, the water-food nexus, and environmental and agricultural conservation policies.Oriented toward problems of the agricultural Midwest, his work has focused on policies that can reduce polluted run-off, restore wetlands, promote ecosystem service provision, and add wind energy as a 21st century “crop.” He has also published on water footprint analysis and virtual water trade. His recent work on NSF’s Coupled Natural and Human Systems program has focused on agent-based modeling and projecting the likely geographic response of the Midwest crop belts (corn, soybeans, wheat, cotton) to climate change.

Download Vitae

peggy petrzelka

PEGGY PETRZELKA

Associate Professor
Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology
Utah State University

peggy.petrzelka@usu.edu

Dr. Petrzelka's research focuses on how social inequalities play out on the physical landscape. Her domestic research highlights the importance of changes in agricultural landownership, which bring multiple social implications such as inequitable power relations between landowners and those who lease their land and how these inequitable relations prevent conservation implementation on the farmland. Her international research examines the impacts of intensified strawberry production in Southern Spain, and the social and political impacts of this intensification as it relates to immigration management, focusing in particular on the gendered aspects of using Moroccan mothers of dependent children for the strawberry agricultural labor.

Download Vitae
 

robert schmidt

ROBERT SCHMIDT

Associate Professor
Department of Environment and Society
Utah State University

robert.schmidt@usu.edu

Dr. Robert Schmidt is an associate professor in the Department of Environment and Society at Utah State University. Dr. Schmidt received his PhD in ecology from the University of California, Davis, and his BS and MS degrees from Ohio State University and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, respectively. His specialty is the human dimensions of wildlife management, particularly with gray wolves and urban wildlife, and he teaches a large general education course titled "Living with Wildlife." His current research interests include the human and ecological components of feral cat management and the ethics of wildlife management techniques, policies, and decisions.

Download Vitae
 

jordan smith

JORDAN SMITH

Assistant Professor
Department of Environment and Society
Utah State University

jordan.smith@usu.edu

Dr. Smith is the Director of the Institute of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Society. His research examines how humans make behavioral and planning adaptations in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. He uses stated preference experiments, geospatial modeling and immersive virtual environments to understand contingent behaviors and preferences.

Download Vitae